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Mobbing Bali: Credo EP.

A carefully balanced alternative-indie debut, laced in classical influences.

28 Nov 2016 / Opinion, Review / written by Skye Mallac

Cape Town hailing alternative-indie outfit Mobbing Bali have just dropped their debut EP “Credo EP.” and it’s been some time since I came across something this unique when it comes to the indie genre. Spearheaded by possibly one of the most underrated vocalists on the scene, Warren Vernon-Driscoll, there is a distinctive classical edge to their sound, placing them in their own chalked-circle entirely.

The seven-track EP is an expertly balanced offering. Their sound is strikingly simple, primarily vocal-centric, and tends to explore the rather more intricately straightforward spectrum. Opening track ‘Brue Lee’ – a typo? A quirk? – is dominated by a percussive, woody sound. A prevailing, stripped down, rock-driven guitar riff forms the backbone of the track while Vernon-Driscoll’s vocals take to the fore. ‘Coffee’ is epitomised by its psycadelic-synth undulation of an opening, proceeding to morph into a twisted classic rock track.

Stuttering radio-static vocals – “My life is a mirror of mystery / skinny dipping in the rivers of history” – and light, high-tone, pattering melody dominates ‘Deceive Me’. Underpinned by an unusual melody, jazz and bluesy influences weave their way in and out of the track – backed by swift piano work, which lends a curiously classical edge to their modernised indie sound.

Forming the ever necessary bridging point within an EP comes ‘Just Calm Down’: a fleeting 22 second piano progression of a song. As if this formed a pivotal point in the project, the following two tracks energetically launch into play. This band has the construction of an EP down to a tee. ‘Maple Syrup’, which was recently released along with its accompanying music video, is a feel-good summery indie-pop offering, while ‘Open Mind’ follows neatly in its footsteps, boasting unusual chord progressions and offsetting, quirky lyrics, “I’m a bubble, she a boiling pot / and I’m in trouble now ’cause she’s too hot.”

In an unexpected turn of events, the EP closes on a minute-long piano and vocal piece. Unapologetically opera-influenced, Vernon-Driscoll’s undeniable vocal talent shines through as they wrap up the project on a strikingly unusual note.

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Listen to “Credo” below on Deezer.