Review

Thabo Krouwkam proves himself more than worthy on his fourth EP, Thabo and the Crows 

In keeping with Thabo Krouwkam’s staple blend of various genres, his latest album Thabo and the Crows is packed with flavour, creating a dynamic and fresh listening experience. And with a slight sonic departure from Meet Me in the Middle, the EP showcases his band’s impressive versatility.

Krouwkam proves his songwriting chops with style, through a well-considered project that closely examines social and political issues. The often energetic offering functions as a bold statement, firmly establishing the band as a force to be reckoned with. 

Opener “Molo Sis” is a scratchy yet soulful track driven by a bluesy sound that features a verse by Zee@Eez. The track sets the tone for the rest of the EP, with an eclectic blending of languages. 

The band goes on to explore South African mythology with “Tokoloshe” – a gritty track that brings to mind Kasabian’s “Shoot the Runner”. Following is “Siyazalana” – meaning ‘we birth each other’. The upbeat tune delves into the spirit of Ubuntu, with a call for us all to love each other, and build community.

“Hunger for Change” is more punk-leaning, and sounds at moments like The Beatles and IDLES had a lovechild. With thought-provoking lyrics, the track calls for positive change and serves as the highlight of the EP.

Speaking on the project, Krouwkam hopes that the EP will take listeners, “On a multi-dimensional sound journey whilst also exploring a wide range of emotional themes. From delving into resistance music and addressing world conflict, to bringing in the concept of Ubuntu, this EP takes you on a wild ride that is authentically South African.”